Notes


Note    N570         Index
Her brother's will of May 1760 only give money to her daughters Mary and Sarah. That probably means that only they were alive in 1760.

Notes


Note    N571         Index
I cannot find her baptism. I have included her as a child from a MI which says: In Memory of Mary Holtom, the daughter of Nicholas and Sarah, his wife who died October 1783, aged 29 years.

Notes


Note    N572         Index
I say she died before 1760 as she is not mentioned in her brother's will. As well, she is referred to therein as "deceased."

Notes


Note    N573         Index
[Murray.FTW]

Ann is buried in Pond Mills Cemetery but her name is not on her husband's
stone. At the time of her death she was living with her oldest daughter,
Jennie on Colborne St., London, ON.

Notes


Note    N574         Index
He and his brother were two families apart in the 1881 census. They both married women of Irish descent. Were they sisters?

In the West Nissouri map from 1862, the two one hundred acre parcels of land directly opposite that of Edward Dunn were in the name of Richard Gough. Was it his two sons?

Notes


Note    N575         Index
In the 1881 census, she is said to be of "Irish" origin.

The Trudgeon Family Tree at http://www.execulink.com/~bloxam/genealogy/trudgeon/minus3/elizabethdunn-3 .htm has her last name as "Elliot."

Notes


Note    N576         Index
I do not know for sure that I have chosen the right brother for the one that married Elizabeth, although based on the 1911 census, I believe that I do. In that census, he lives at the village of Ballymote with Elizabeth, Willie and Maggie.

However, there is also an Alexander Gough on the same page married to Els? His father Richard G. Gough also lives there. He was born in what seems to be 1850.

In the 1921 census, he is living with his sister Margaret and brother-in-law, Edward Dunn. He is not with a wife but he is noted as married.


Notes


Note    N577         Index
Glenna Jamieson says that he "re-married" Margaret Elliot. Has she got her Williams mixed up? Who was his first wife?

Notes


Note    N578         Index
[Murray.FTW]

Jane and John live in Toronto, ON.

Notes


Note    N579         Index
[Murray.FTW]

They live in St. Marys, ON.

Notes


Note    N580         Index
[Murray.FTW]

They live in Woodstock, ON.

Notes


Note    N581         Index
[Murray.FTW]

They live in Woodstock, ON.

Notes


Note    N582         Index
[Murray.FTW]

Ann is living in Toronto, ON.

Notes


Note    N583         Index
[Murray.FTW]

Walter graduated from Ridley College, McGill University and Osgoode Hall. He
was a pilot in the R.C.A.F. in WW II. He was with the Toronto General Trust.
They live in Toronto, ON.

Notes


Note    N584         Index
They live in Toronto, Ontario.
John Grieve Lind got both. He had the satisfaction of making the effort as well as the reward of leaving the Klondike a rich man.
He hadn't been one when he first headed west from Ontario. he came from a poor family and was one of eleven children. Grandson Phil Lind, a successful media entrepreneur in Toronto now, recalls that his grandfather had only a grade 6 education when he went "railroading".
But he had drive, and by 1894 he had become a successful contractor and had gained experience building bridges and other engineering challenges.
Walter, his 82 year old son, looked around the Discovery Claim on Bonanza Creek on July 5, 1997 and concluded that his father had learned the skills he needed to work in the Klondike. He and a partner, a man named Mitchell, had come north in 1893 or 94, Walter recalls, and were already in Fortymile when the news of the Rabbit Creek find got there.
In short order they were in the Klondike, buying up shares in a dozen claims, ending up with over 4,000 men working ground where they had a stake. By the time the news of the strike hit the outside world in Seattle in July 1897, Lind was already successful. He continued to amass wealth here until 1902.
Walter says that his dad could see the end of the small time operations by then and was ready to move on. "He went home...put (his money) into cement, and with the help of others built up a formidable cement business in Canada."
The business was only recently sold to British interests, having survived long enough to be the last large independent Canadian company of its type.
J. G. Lind never returned to the Yukon, but some members of his family have been back often.
"This is my fifth trip," said Walter, who came for the Ton of Gold celebrations. He's walked, canoed, driven and flown to the Klondike over the years. "We've come every way you can."
That's not true of all the members of his family, but it's certainly true of his son, Phil, who looks at his grandfather's accomplishments as a kind of lesson in character building.
Phil Lind talks of the Klondike as if he wants to be laughing all the time he's here, as if he's full of energy and good will for the place.
"It's been kind of a tradition in our family... What was told to us was that you could do anything if you set your mind to it, because that's how grandfather did it.
"I think it's about the spirit of what is encompassed here rather than the actual (fact) that he went and mined for gold. There's a lot of philosophy behind this thing...the spirit of the Yukon, which is that there are opportunities available, but it's not easy. Life isn't easy so you have to work to succeed."
That work may be hard, but it has rewards that may be passed on through generations.
"In a way our family...started right here," says Phil Lind, gazing around the Klondike hills on the Bonanza Creek Road. "He carved out a new dimension for our family. It was a pivotal point in our family's development."
Phil Lind has bought the philosophy completely, and has a personal fascination with the place that nurtured it.
"I'm a small time collector of memorabilia," he admits.
"He's a Yukon fanatic," breaks in local historian Michael Gates.
Lind beams. "It's always fascinated me. This is one of the best stories that Canada has. It has everything. It juxtaposes us vis-a-vis the United States. It's a perfect context - how the Americans were here, had their own societal makeup and how we dealt with that in Canada.
"It's just a great, great story."
The Lind family enthusiasm can be seen in practical terms in the fact that 24 family members turned up for this year's centennial highlight, the Ton of Gold recreation. If it's a great story, they're determined to be a part of it.