Notes


Note    N252         Index
In this case I had trouble reading the writing of Mr. Grylls who transcribed the parish records; I could not tell if her name was Eustice or Eastice.

Notes


Note    N253         Index
He was described as being from Lostwithiel at the time of his death. Do I have the right Charles? Mike Haley believes that Charles married Anne Smith in St. Winnow and that they had at least three children there. Certinaly the middle name of Martin would be strong evidence.

Notes


Note    N254         Index
He is described as being from St. Sampsons at his death.

Notes


Note    N255         Index
She may be the Elizabeth Haly who married William Scantlebury on December 29, 1784.

Notes


Note    N256         Index
For Elizabeth and her siblings, the birth dates are in fact the baptismal dates.

Notes


Note    N257         Index
I suspect that his father was "John" and his mother "Julian", as they lived in Broadoak and were having children at about the right time. The other possibility was Ralphe and Joanne. The

Notes


Note    N258         Index
Her birth date is a baptism date taken from the parish records. In fact, this is the case with almost all such dates unless I indicate otherwise.

Notes


Note    N259         Index
One parish register shows her baptism as January 29, 1790 and the other as April 4, 1790. Why?

Notes


Note    N260         Index
He is described as a widower in the parish marriage register. The Witnesses to the marriage were Hy, Libby and Abraham Haley. The presiding official was Arthur Tatham, Rector.

He was a neighbour in the 1841 census, at 55 Clearbrook

Notes


Note    N261         Index
She is described as a "base" child One presumes that a Mr. Wilcock - of which there were many in the parish - was the father. Is that why her mother married a widower? In the 1841 census, she was using the name Haley.

Notes


Note    N262         Index
She is described as a widow, so her maiden name was obviously "Rowe." I have not looked for her first marriage.

Notes


Note    N263         Index
The IGI has a John Dunn marrying an Elizabeth Hedley on April 26, 1806 in Elsdon, Northumberland. I did not see that marriage when I had the parish film but have put it in for the moment. This same IGI batch has many Dunns marrying right back to 1705. It has even more Hedleys. (See batch P001711; C001712; E001711; C001712; M001711 and M001712.)

If they followed naming conventions here, then John's father would have been an Edward Dun(n). There are more than one Edward Dunn in Elsdon in the late 1700's but no one is an obvious candidate.

Jean Carter found a marriage by Banns in Elsdon, between John Dunn of Edgerston in the Parish of Jedburgh, England and Elizabeth Hedley of Ivestones, Elsdon, published on April 6th, 13th and 20th, 1806. The marriage was noted to then have been performed on April 27, 1806 by John Hewetson, curate. The witnesses were Anthony Fletcher and Roger Hedley. Was that her brother or her father? The IGI has five females named Elizabeth Hedley baptised in Elsdon between 1777 and 1797. Although none have a Roger Hedley as a father.

There is a Roger Hedley baptised on March 7, 1742 at Elsdon, Northumberland, England. His parents are James Hedley and Elizabeth. A Roger Hedley marries a Mary Turnbull on May 25, 1777. There are quite a number of Roger Hedleys in Elsdon. I have to wonder if that is where Roger Dunn's name came from? I suspect so, given the witnesses to Elizabeth's wedding.

In the 1841 UK census for Elsdon, there is a John Dunn, living alone, who was born in 1775.

This area of England/Scotland was known as the Borders. The Following is (Excerpted from The Elliot's Border Reiver Page)
Who were the Border Reivers? The Border Reivers were a group of Anglo-Scottish families that conducted raids against towns, farms and even fortresses during some of the most turbulent years in British history.
The region between Scotland and England, which includes The Borders, Dumfries and Galloway on the Scottish side, and Cumbria and Northumbria in England, were war torn and unsettled for more than three hundred years.
From the reign of Robert The Bruce to the ascension of James I to the throne of England, Scottish and English armies led punitive expeditions against one another, ravaging the countryside.
These were also years of great treachery, during which many families, noble and common alike, switched allegiances as it suited them. Those families that resided along either side of the border did not know whom to trust, and took the law into their own hands to survive. Alliances developed, like the bond between the Elliotts and the Armstrongs - but so did feuds, such as those between the Kerrs and the Scotts, the Maxwells and the Johnstones, and the Fenwicks and the Elliotts. These families sallied forth against one another, stealing cattle and sheep, burning homesteads, and avenging grievances with utmost violence.Officially at peace, the raids continued.
The Border Reivers became so inured to the continual strife in their lives that, when they baptized their sons, they left the right hand unblessed, so that in time of feud he would be better equipped to strike unhallowed blows on his family's enemy's. That was when they baptized their sons at all.
The Border Reivers were not known for their piety. It was said that they would deceive and rob Jesus himself if he rode among them.
A tale is often told of how a man visiting The Borders asked why there were no churches in the town, to which his interlocutor replied, "Nae, we're all Elliotts 'n' Armstrongs here." Nor were the churchmen any fonder of the reivers. The Archbishop of Glasgow publicly cursed them with a resounding ferocity that still has the power to chill our souls.
Riding their shaggy ponies of Norse extraction, Called "Hobby's" dressed in an assortment of helmets and homemade armour, the Kerr's and their counterparts brought sword and musket to bear against their enemies with neither rest nor mercy. Even when England and Scotland were officially at peace, the raids continued.
Where did they come from?
The border region between Scotland and England has been a melting pot since before The Middle Ages.
According to James Leyburn, author of The Scotch-Irish, the Lowland Scots were a mixture of nine main groups - Picts , Gaelic Scotti, Brythonic Celts, Irish emigrants, Angles , Saxons , including the Frisian's , Norse and the descendants of the soldiers who manned the frontier forts of Roman Britain .
These, plus a smattering of Norman nobles and Flemish traders - even a few Hungarian courtiers from the entourage of Margaret Atheling, bride of Malcolm Canmore - made the people of this region one of the most diverse in the Medieval British Isles.
Certain groups were more prevalent in some areas than in others. The Flemish gravitated to Edinburgh, while Northumbria was ruled by Angles and Danes.
Irish-Norwegian Vikings , fleeing from The Battle of Clontarf in 1014, sailed from Dublin to Cumbria, and settled from the coast to the Pennines. Celtic tribes like the Brigantes preceded the Norse in Cumbria , while the Gall-Gaedhil - Irish Gaels who had defected to the pagan ways of the Vikings - merged with the native Britons of Galloway.
Sarmatian cavalrymen, drafted from the plains of Hungary and the Russian steppes to support the interests of Rome, stayed to settle in Lancashire . Here, over time, they became as much Celtic as Roman, possibly contributing to the legend of King Arthur's mounted knights .
Centuries later, more soldiers came, and Norman families like the De Bruses and the De Vauxes raised castles all across the land.
All these groups became, collectively, the ancestors of the Border Reivers.
What happened to them and where are they now? The era of the Border Reivers ended abruptly when Elizabeth I died and James I was crowned King of England.(Excerpted from The Elliot's Border Reiver Page)
The Reiver Families

ARMSTRONG BEATTIE BELL BURNS CARLETON CARLISLE CARNABY CARRS CARRUTHERS CHAMBERLAIN CHARLTON COLLINGWOOD CRISP CROZIER CUTHBERT DACRE DAVISON DIXON DODD DOUGLAS DUNNE ELLIOT FENWICK FORSTER GRAHAM GRAY HALL HEDLEY HENDERSON HERON HETHERINGTON / HUME IRVINE IRVING JOHNSTONE KERR LAIDLAW LITTLE LOWTHER MAXWELL MILBURN MUSGROVE NIXON NOBLE OGLE OLIVER POTTS PRINGLE RADCLIFFE READE RIDLEY ROBSON ROUTLEDGE RUTHERFORD SALKELD SCOTT < SELBY SHAFTOE STOREY SIMPSON TAIT TAYLOR TROTTER TURNBULL WAKE WATSON WILSON WOODRINGTON YOUNG

For almost400 years, from the early 14th century, the Northumberland and Scottishfamilies fought a seemingly endless series of raids and reprisals. Sheep stealing and burning each others homes became part of everyday life. They were rugged, tough people who lived by their own laws and became knownas the Border Reivers. Today their descendants can be found all overthe World. If you have one of the names listed above or have eversuspected that your relatives were the villainous type you can probablynow have your worst fears confirmed.
The Reiver Families

ARMSTRONG BEATTIE BELL BURNS CARLETON CARLISLE CARNABY CARRS CARRUTHERS CHAMBERLAIN CHARLTON COLLINGWOOD CRISP CROZIER CUTHBERT DACRE DAVISON DIXON DODD DOUGLAS DUNNE ELLIOT FENWICK FORSTER GRAHAM GRAY HALL HEDLEY HENDERSON HERON HETHERINGTON / HUME IRVINE IRVING JOHNSTONE KERR LAIDLAW LITTLE LOWTHER MAXWELL MILBURN MUSGROVE NIXON NOBLE OGLE OLIVER POTTS PRINGLE RADCLIFFE READE RIDLEY ROBSON ROUTLEDGE RUTHERFORD SALKELD SCOTT < SELBY SHAFTOE STOREY SIMPSON TAIT TAYLOR TROTTER TURNBULL WAKE WATSON WILSON WOODRINGTON YOUNG

For almost400 years, from the early 14th century, the Northumberland and Scottishfamilies fought a seemingly endless series of raids and reprisals. Sheep stealing and burning each others homes became part of everyday life. They were rugged, tough people who lived by their own laws and became knownas the Border Reivers. Today their descendants can be found all overthe World. If you have one of the names listed above or have eversuspected that your relatives were the villainous type you can probablynow have your worst fears confirmed.

The Reiver Families

ARMSTRONG BEATTIE BELL BURNS CARLETON CARLISLE CARNABY CARRS CARRUTHERS CHAMBERLAIN CHARLTON COLLINGWOOD CRISP CROZIER CUTHBERT DACRE DAVISON DIXON DODD DOUGLAS DUNNE ELLIOT FENWICK FORSTER GRAHAM GRAY HALL HEDLEY HENDERSON HERON HETHERINGTON / HUME IRVINE IRVING JOHNSTONE KERR LAIDLAW LITTLE LOWTHER MAXWELL MILBURN MUSGROVE NIXON NOBLE OGLE OLIVER POTTS PRINGLE RADCLIFFE READE RIDLEY ROBSON ROUTLEDGE RUTHERFORD SALKELD SCOTT < SELBY SHAFTOE STOREY SIMPSON TAIT TAYLOR TROTTER TURNBULL WAKE WATSON WILSON WOODRINGTON YOUNG

For almost400 years, from the early 14th century, the Northumberland and Scottishfamilies fought a seemingly endless series of raids and reprisals. Sheep stealing and burning each others homes became part of everyday life. They were rugged, tough people who lived by their own laws and became knownas the Border Reivers. Today their descendants can be found all overthe World. If you have one of the names listed above or have eversuspected that your relatives were the villainous type you can probablynow have your worst fears confirmed.

The Reiver Families

ARMSTRONG BEATTIE BELL BURNS CARLETON CARLISLE CARNABY CARRS CARRUTHERS CHAMBERLAIN CHARLTON COLLINGWOOD CRISP CROZIER CUTHBERT DACRE DAVISON DIXON DODD DOUGLAS DUNNE ELLIOT FENWICK FORSTER GRAHAM GRAY HALL HEDLEY HENDERSON HERON HETHERINGTON / HUME IRVINE IRVING JOHNSTONE KERR LAIDLAW LITTLE LOWTHER MAXWELL MILBURN MUSGROVE NIXON NOBLE OGLE OLIVER POTTS PRINGLE RADCLIFFE READE RIDLEY ROBSON ROUTLEDGE RUTHERFORD SALKELD SCOTT < SELBY SHAFTOE STOREY SIMPSON TAIT TAYLOR TROTTER TURNBULL WAKE WATSON WILSON WOODRINGTON YOUNG

For almost400 years, from the early 14th century, the Northumberland and Scottishfamilies fought a seemingly endless series of raids and reprisals. Sheep stealing and burning each others homes became part of everyday life. They were rugged, tough people who lived by their own laws and became knownas the Border Reivers. Today their descendants can be found all overthe World. If you have one of the names listed above or have eversuspected that your relatives were the villainous type you can probablynow have your worst fears confirmed.